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It’s Now Legal for Police to Hack Your Computer Without a Warrant in Britain?

It’s Now Legal for Police to Hack Your Computer Without a Warrant in Britain?

If it’s the job of the government to safeguard the interests of citizens, it’s sure hard to tell these days with moves like this.

Fresh on the heals of India adopting new surveillance techniques that make privacy one step closer to becoming history in that country, the Home Office of Britain has adopted a plan for British police to covertly hack citizens computers without a warrant.

Basically, if a police officer wanted to, he can go wardriving through the streets to find a persons computer and hack it. Failing that, police can send a malicious e-mail containing something like a keylogger and record things like e-mails and instant messages. Combined with EU legislation, anything found can be sent to other countries in Europe. It’s worth noting the irony in this – some authorities might be more than willing to point to how dangerous the internet is with cyber crime and, in turn, make the internet more dangerous with their presence.

Of course, it’s not really called hacking if police do it – it’s called “remote searching”. The euphemism is applied when it is explained that the police have to say that they had reason to believe some crime is about to take place. This can easily be taken in two different ways depending who you ask. Either this translates to, “We needed to go wardriving into your computer under some excuse we made up on the spot” or, “In order to protect the better public interest, we need to make sure people aren’t breaking laws on their personal computers.”

Either way, British civil liberties groups were not amused.

Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, the human rights group, said she would challenge the legal basis of the move. ‚ÄúThese are very intrusive powers ‚Ä” as intrusive as someone busting down your door and coming into your home,‚ÄĚ she said.

‚ÄúThe public will want this to be controlled by new legislation and judicial authorisation. Without those safeguards it‚Äôs a devastating blow to any notion of personal privacy.‚ÄĚ

The police were on the defense of this:

The Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo) said such intrusive surveillance was closely regulated under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. A spokesman said police were already carrying out a small number of these operations which were among 194 clandestine searches last year of people’s homes, offices and hotel bedrooms.

‚ÄúTo be a valid authorisation, the officer giving it must believe that when it is given it is necessary to prevent or detect serious crime and [the] action is proportionate to what it seeks to achieve,‚ÄĚ Acpo said.

(Source: Times Online)

All the while, the government appears to not have not revealed a stitch of safeguards judging by these early reports (though the government may wind up revealing a few soon since this move has also angered opposition MPs)

Not mentioned in the Times article is what kind of consequences this could have for other laws that could be proposed in the future. Already, the MPAA have been trying to lobby the government for a way to ‘automatically’ eliminate alleged piracy online internationally. It would be a surprise if the industry didn’t try and twist this into something for their own financial interests. It’s already starting to look like it’ll be another long year.

(Hat tip: Open Rights Group)

Jorge A. Gonzalez
Founder of ZeroPaid.com and various other websites. Follow me on your favorite social network. Twitter | Google Plus
esecallum
esecallum

Just give them what they want.Information. i have gigabytes of useless information which they can have... All someone has to do is write software which can generate gigabytes of random seemingly coherent information...remember that program which generates essays/statements/verbose high density ambigious/political/corporate/prose from a few key words...just imagine this being installed and generating gigabytes of text files for the police state to sift through. here is a sample of that essay...generated by the dida speech engine.... Department of Peace Studies University of North Carolina 1. Discourses of genre ‚ÄúConsciousness is part of the defining characteristic of reality‚ÄĚ says Derrida. Therefore if Marxist socialism holds we have to choose between socialist realism and dialectic predeconstructivist theory. The characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the absurdity of textual class. In the works of Smith a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Thus von Junz[1] implies that we have to choose between subtextual dialectic theory and dialectic narrative. The subject is contextualised into a presemantic sublimation that includes language as a totality. ‚ÄúSociety is fundamentally impossible‚ÄĚ says Bataille. However Lacan uses the term ‚ÄėLyotardist narrative‚Äô to denote not deappropriation but subdeappropriation. The primary theme of Drucker‚Äôs[2] essay on subtextual dialectic theory is the common ground between class and society. But an abundance of constructions concerning a postcapitalist paradox exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the role of the artist as participant. Therefore in Clerks Smith affirms structuralist theory; in Mallrats however he analyses socialist realism. Subtextual dialectic theory states that reality is capable of intention. But a number of narratives concerning Lyotardist narrative may be revealed. If subtextual dialectic theory holds the works of Smith are modernistic. Thus the subject is interpolated into a socialist realism that includes sexuality as a totality. Many sublimations concerning the dialectic and hence the futility of neopatriarchial sexual identity exist. 2. Smith and Lyotardist narrative ‚ÄúConsciousness is part of the genre of truth‚ÄĚ says Sontag; however according to la Tournier[3] it is not so much consciousness that is part of the genre of truth but rather the dialectic and some would say the absurdity of consciousness. But Buxton[4] implies that we have to choose between socialist realism and the structural paradigm of context. Debord uses the term ‚Äôsubtextual dialectic theory‚Äô to denote the role of the observer as reader. However the stasis and therefore the meaninglessness of Lyotardist narrative depicted in Pynchon‚Äôs Mason & Dixon is also evident in Vineland. The subject is contextualised into a socialist realism that includes art as a whole. In a sense the main theme of d‚ÄôErlette‚Äôs[5] critique of dialectic capitalism is a self-sufficient reality. The premise of socialist realism holds that reality is created by communication. However if Lyotardist narrative holds the works of Pynchon are postmodern. Derrida promotes the use of subtextual dialectic theory to deconstruct hierarchy. 3. Contexts of dialectic If one examines socialist realism one is faced with a choice: either accept subcultural narrative or conclude that the media is intrinsically responsible for outmoded colonialist perceptions of society but only if culture is interchangeable with reality; if that is not the case language is used to reinforce capitalism. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a Lyotardist narrative that includes truth as a totality. Buxton[6] suggests that we have to choose between the modern paradigm of reality and precapitalist nihilism. But the subject is contextualised into a subtextual dialectic theory that includes narrativity as a paradox. Bataille‚Äôs essay on socialist realism states that sexual identity has objective value. In a sense several appropriations concerning Lyotardist narrative may be discovered. Sontag suggests the use of socialist realism to modify sexuality. 4. Subtextual dialectic theory and the cultural paradigm of context ‚ÄúClass is a legal fiction‚ÄĚ says Lacan; however according to Dahmus[7] it is not so much class that is a legal fiction but rather the stasis and eventually the rubicon of class. However in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz Burroughs examines neopatriarchial desublimation; in Junky he reiterates the cultural paradigm of context. The subject is interpolated into a socialist realism that includes consciousness as a totality. ‚ÄúNarrativity is part of the defining characteristic of truth‚ÄĚ says Debord. In a sense if subtextual dialectic theory holds the works of Burroughs are an example of cultural nationalism. Lacan uses the term ‚Äėthe postdialectic paradigm of consensus‚Äô to denote the difference between society and language. ‚ÄúSexual identity is meaningless‚ÄĚ says Lyotard; however according to Parry[8] it is not so much sexual identity that is meaningless but rather the collapse and subsequent dialectic of sexual identity. However in Sex Madonna denies the cultural paradigm of context; in Material Girl although she examines subtextual dialectic theory. The subject is contextualised into a structural objectivism that includes reality as a reality. In the works of Madonna a predominant concept is the concept of pretextual culture. Therefore Dahmus[9] suggests that we have to choose between the cultural paradigm of context and subtextual deconstructive theory. Marx promotes the use of pretextual narrative to challenge hierarchy. It could be said that if socialist realism holds the works of Madonna are reminiscent of Koons. The premise of subtextual dialectic theory states that language is fundamentally a legal fiction. However Lyotard uses the term ‚Äėdialectic nationalism‚Äô to denote the role of the observer as reader. An abundance of appropriations concerning a mythopoetical paradox exist. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a socialist realism that includes culture as a totality. Lacan uses the term ‚ÄėBaudrillardist hyperreality‚Äô to denote not narrative as socialist realism suggests but neonarrative. In a sense the subject is contextualised into a subtextual dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a whole. Debord uses the term ‚Äėpostconstructive textual theory‚Äô to denote the paradigm and some would say the futility of prepatriarchialist class. But in Erotica Madonna denies the cultural paradigm of context; in Material Girl however she examines socialist realism. Lacan suggests the use of subtextual dialectic theory to read and deconstruct language.

esecallum
esecallum

just imagine that policeman having to read gigabytes of the above.it will take him years... now multiply that by nearly everyone this bullshit on their pc. remember a gigabyte of text files is equal to 10000 books.happy reading police state.



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