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Anonymous Posts ISP Source Code to Retaliate Against Censorship

Anonymous Posts ISP Source Code to Retaliate Against Censorship

Previously, Anonymous has leaked details of the Orange Country Democrats. Now, it seems, they have decided to post source code and blacklist data of a Dutch ISP after the ISP decided to act on government requests to censor Internet traffic.

The wave of hacking has yet to subside at all if the latest activity is any indication. Information regarding the latest data dump has been posted to pastebin while VOIP blocking data has been posted to PasteHTML (Caution: multiple certificate errors) and source code from servers have been posted to MediaFire – a file that appears to be about 4.25MB.

Anonymous has released a statement in regard to this latest release:

To all friendly and enemy vessels,

Today we want to introduce you to Nimbuzz, a Dutch company providing a free mobile messaging application carrying the same name. This company is not situated in just the Netherlands as they have offices in Argentina, India, Indonesia and all over Europe. So why does this company interest us? Well, simply put, they are capable and self-admittingly willing to co-operate with governments to help censor the public’s use of the very service they offer.

Now it should be noted that some of our blackhat friends who are extensively involved in the AntiSec movement have had access to this company’s networks for some time. Their access to this network is best described as complete access to everything in their network including all of their source code on Nimbuzz’s svn server. The gross incompetence of the security model put in place for this server astounded even us.

We have access to many many networks and because of this we have to prioritize what is of interest or use to us (or you, the public that we love so much). However, we had some friends bring it to our attention that this Nimbuzz company is actually enacting policies that directly go against everything Antisec stands for. Thus, here we are.

To prove that we aren’t making this up here is a document in their CMS displaying the procedure of how, if requested, they can switch off VOIP services BY GOVERNMENT REQUEST. A quote from the document:

“In some countries governments and/or operators have reasons for not allowing VoIP over (mobile) data networks. They may use technical means to active block and / or throttle the Nimbuzz traffic over their network. This results in total, partial or severe Nimbuzz service degradation towards the end-user.

When these cases are known, Nimbuzz will open dialogue with the government/operator. Aim is to resolve the service degradation and restore quality of service. In return for allowing Nimbuzz service to run properly, we can offer to switch of VoIP calls on this operator network.”

The document goes further to state that Nimbuzz currently blocks all VOIP traffic in Syria and Egypt and even includes specific data such as IP ranges given by providers.

This is entirely unacceptable and let’s make this perfectly clear:

We DO NOT tolerate any kind of censorship of communication.

We DO NOT tolerate companies working in collusion with governments to stop the free flow of information

We WILL expose these companies to the public to show how their information can be manipulated and censored by the governments and corporations that work with them

Thus, we release the document mentioned above in full as well as some other information from their CMS. As a bonus we have also acquired some code from the /trunk directory on their svn. In total we downloaded over 120 Gigabyte of source code but will not release it..yet.

Take heed, governments that seek to oppose the people who elect them and the corporations who the people work for – We will not stand idly by while you take away our electronic and physical freedom.

“People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people.”

This development is interesting because late last month, an Australian ISP hesitated on implementing government mandated censorship fearing “reprisals” from groups such as Anonymous and LulzSec. While the ISP has moved forward with their censorship plans, it seems that Anonymous has shown that they won’t hesitate to retaliate against ISPs who support or are co-operative with government mandated censorship.

So far, this isn’t looking like things are going to end well for one entity at the very least.

Have a tip? Want to contact the author? You can do so by sending a PM via the forums or via e-mail at [email protected].

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson is perhaps one of the more well-known file-sharing and technology news writers around. A journalist in the field since 2005, his work has had semi-regular appearances on social news websites and even occasional appearances on major news outlets as well. Drew founded freezenet.ca and still contributes to ZeroPaid. Twitter | Google Plus
bu9traq
bu9traq

whereis the mirror link for downloading the source code???? Mediafire has removed it from their server ....

Jamitha
Jamitha

I very good read. I hope to hear more about the Australian ISPs in the future.

ARistophrenia
ARistophrenia

@Monkey Internet service provider comes in many forms - http, voip, tcp, ftp, news,wap etc.

M0nk3y
M0nk3y

Drew, nice post, but Nimbuzz is NOT an ISP. It is merely a company that is similar to Skype.

Friendly Donkey
Friendly Donkey

This explosive movement is fantastic, and I'm so glad there's a social conscience behind it. I even saw an article in the New York times yesterday about it, too, some Fox "News" twitter thing, involving the alleged assassination of Obama. However, I fear the reprisals will be a further tightening of the internet, conveniently allowed by an apathetic and uninformed public. Likely some shit starter at some point will do something really dumb and the media will grab a hold of it and make the whole movement appear to be a reflection of that stupidity. In the mean time, though, I hope these movements spread like wildfire.

ROland
ROland

@M0nk3y that is the definition of an ISP. Internet Service provider. service can be access to the internet itself or a service on the said internet.

dougm
dougm

you don't believe in the right to privacy? this is asinine, childish, some tin foil head living in mom's basement craving for attention.

Fnord
Fnord

The right to privacy? NOT for governments. Remember, we are supposed to be the bosses (at least that's what they keep telling us) in a democratic system, so we should be able to see exactly what our employees are doing on our behalf.

Friendly Donkey
Friendly Donkey

Right to privacy, yes, of course I think it's imperative. That's ridiculous. I can see how a person who actually thinks capitalism and democracy are possible and fair could be angry at such "childish" endeavours. However, others who perceive the world as an increasingly suffocating, conglomerated, anti-democratic, anti-economic place, what else can one do but encourage subversiveness which creeps out of the cracks. And as I specified, it's the socially conscience focus which I encourage. Using the limited means one has to express oneself in a way which has an actual impact is fine with me. As well, in regard to your comments about the "tin foil head," everyone generally craves attention. If the focus of that attention is socially positive, then it's not so important what their true intentions are. I.E., regardless of Julien Assange's intentions, whether he genuinely wanted to bring important information to the public, or wanted attention, or both, the fact is, the positive impact and effectiveness of wikileaks still stands. BTW, an angry denigrating comment without any intellectual articulation is also childish, dougm. :)

Friendly Donkey
Friendly Donkey

Fnord, good point about governmental transparency and its limitations in regards to privacy.



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