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RIAA: Anonymous, LulzSec Hacks Prove Need for PROTECT IP Act!

RIAA: Anonymous, LulzSec Hacks Prove Need for PROTECT IP Act!

Says hacktivist group’s campaign against public websites like the US Senate, CIA, and more recently, the Arizona Police Dept, prove a “lawless Internet” is not a “good thing,” and that legislation like the PROTECT IP Act that would mandate DNS filtering of “rogue sites” is needed to restore order.

Leave it to the RIAA to rehash the usual bait-and-switch tactics of old when it comes to convincing the public that its own selfish commercial interests are really for the public good.

In a posting on its site it asks that Senators don’t waver on pending legislation that would require ISPs to block copyright infringing websites. Known as DNS filtering, the measure is part of the “Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011,” or the “PROTECT IP Act.

The RIAA says the legislation is necessary to restore order to a “lawless Internet” where hacktivist groups like LulzSec and Anonymous are able to roam free.

“And in a world where hackers set their sights on new targets every day ” most recently the official United States Senate website, allegedly the CIA’s public website and Arizona’s law enforcement database ” do we think a lawless Internet defended to the extreme is a good thing?” it said.

Notice how the RIAA is combining two completely different topics? The RIAA is trying to make the case for filtering the Internet on the backs of hacktivist groups that expose the security flaws or misdeeds of others.

The RIAA’s failed business model is solely to blame for its woes, and yet it’s trying to argue that more laws are the panaca. You can’t forcibly turn consumers into paying customers any more that you can dictate who their favorite artists will be. Filtering the Internet won’t fix the music industry’s refusal to give music fans what they want and where they want it.

A group of 87 prominent engineers who played critical roles in the development of the Internet have warned in the past that DNS filtering risks “fragmenting the Internet’s global domain name system (DNS),” and would “create an environment of tremendous fear and uncertainty for technological innovation, and seriously harm the credibility of the United States in its role as a steward of key Internet infrastructure. ”

The RIAA dismisses this concern and points to other countries that have already implemented DNS filtering as proof the Web has not “broken,” but I’m inclined to believe the experts in their field that it is likely to happen.

Another criticism of the PROTECT-IP Act is that DNS filtering is easily circumventable, rendering the whole process an exercise in futility.

“That’s silly,” it said. “No enforcement program, either in law enforcement or civil litigation, can ever be expected to eradicate a problem.  The perfect cannot be the enemy of the good.  We know that there are dedicated hardcore users will find ways around the law regardless of what legal or technological barriers are erected.  But isn’t it worthwhile to make it harder to find and access illicit sites that no one defends?”

How “dedicated” or “hardcore” do you have to be to use one of the thousands of free proxy servers that exist? Easier still one can simply enter the IP address of the affected site. It’s well known that teenagers are the music industry’s best customers, and yet they’ll be the most adept at bypassing the legislation.

There’s also the pesky fact that 75% of global P2P traffic takes place outside US borders. So if the bill manages to somehow miraculously cut P2P traffic in this country by half (very unlikely) we get down to an even more meager 12.5% of the problem as a whole, making the legislation further questionable.

Filtering the Internet won’t restore order to a “lawless Internet” any more that it will magically turn people into paying customers.

Using LulzSec and Anonymous to seemingly scare Senators into enacting the PROTECT-IP Act has nothing to do with the public interest, and everything to do with the RIAA’s continued reliance on law enforcement to fix a business model ill-suited for a digital world.

Has the RIAA realized that even if P2P were magically eliminated this very moment FREE MUSIC is still plentiful on the likes of YouTube, Pandora, Last.fm, etc.?

Stay tuned.

[email protected]

Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
Empress
Empress

The laws are as stupid as the law makers. Ftards at best. Now ANYONE can hack from anywhere & I will tell you how. All you need is a yardsale bought laptop/stolen one and a connection. If you live in a big city you can pretty much drive around and pick up a signal anywhere. This cannot be tracked nor traced as the computer has been registered to the previous user who of course no longer has the computer. Also hard to track when hacker is moving. So the law will do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING FOR PROTECTION. IT IS ALL ABOUT SPYING ON YOU & KEEP TRACK OF YOU, THE AMERICAN CITIZEN WITH NO RIGHTS. All of the corporations have the rights not you. By the way the RIAA DOES NOT HAVE the right to make any laws on the net. They are trying to take it over like they do everything else. Time to really tighten down & boycott all industries that rely on them (RIAA) no more buying movies or music let them sit & spin!!!

dars
dars

so, is China right after all?

anon
anon

Government : If you think the problems are bad, wait until you see our solutions.Any people that would give up liberty for a little temporary safety deserves neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin FranklinIf, from the more wretched parts of the old world, we look at those which are in an advanced stage of improvement we still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised to furnish new pretences for revenue and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey, and permits none to escape without a tribute. – Thomas Paine

Kevin McAleavey
Kevin McAleavey

Hope I don't get sued for quoting a line from "Back to the Future" but DNS lookups are like earthbound highways. With Mr. Fusion hooked up to the DeLorean, Doc corrects his young protege by saying, "where we're going, we don't NEED roads."Bring it on, RIAA - that's my real name.

Shayneo
Shayneo

How the *fuck* would DNS filtering stop....wait, my brain hurts

Bonnie
Bonnie

Nonsense!Where's the proof that this group acted independently?Is the public supposed to believe the Feds? After all the abuse and jackbooting they've done to us?HAHAHAH!These experts and professionals are obviously, from one of the alphabet agencies, a front to CREATE an excuse for them to stomp onf the Free Internet.

LulzSec is a bunch of bored 4channers
LulzSec is a bunch of bored 4channers

and if you seriously think it's the RIAA hacking sites under an alias to further their agenda then you are one of those conspiracy nuts people read about. I'm sorry. This is just another example of someone taking advantage of a situation to further their corporate or political agenda. That's how the US works on a day-to-day basis.

obvious troll
obvious troll

Obvious troll is obvious:step 1: Wreak havoc in the guise of internet hackers step 2: Use said havoc to justify reduction of freedom step 3: Profit!If you don't have good security, don't make the whole internet pay. Make your security better.

Anonymous
Anonymous

America's road ways are lawless and are used to move illegal drugs, criminals, and the RIAA Lawyers every day. We should focus on putting more filters on our roads. Every town should have a road block that checks every vehicle for illegal contraband. By protecting our roads, will eliminate all forms of crime and make America a safer place.Obviously you are reading this and saying to yourself, what the hell is this guy rambling about? But seriously, the internet is like a road, and once you regulate the hell out of it, it loses its utility.Whiteness the death throws of an antiquated business model that is attempting to make itself relevant through legislation.

Seriously
Seriously

Hackers should stop posting all their stuff publicly and should keep themselves low-profile and sell them on the black market. Nobody would care about security then.

Meowmix
Meowmix

You really think the hackers are to blame, as if them exploiting a vulnerability means they are at fault for the idiocracy of america.

disinter
disinter

I don't know why this isn't brought up more often but the hacking is ALREADY illegal. The hackers don't give a fuck about the laws on the books now so why would anyone in their right mind assume they will care about new laws?

Conspiracy
Conspiracy

We need the best conspiracy theorists ON BOARD right now to spin this towards a relationship between RIAA and MPAA with the Antisec and LulzSec before it is too late!!Antisec & Lulzsec = proper cockblockers..They will be the reason why the government will impose this law on EVERYONE ...and then what are they going to do? Hack every ISP on american soil? get real and dont be stupid.

Erik
Erik

I knew it... all of a sudden, all of these 'hacking groups' come out of the woodwork just as these draconian cyberlegislation proposals are being pushed by lobbyists and government. I bet that they are co-intel operatives, being paid very well to carry out these 'attacks', some possibly complying with under-the-table plea agreements to prior computer crimes. Now I see the motives coming into view. These guys give true hackers a bad name. Whenever you see something plastered all over the media, and the motives don't quite make sense, watch for who stands to gain, and what happens consequently...

Jared Lee Loughner
Jared Lee Loughner

I would like to restore order to any prick in a suit, who thinks he can sell out humanity and get away with it....

fake
fake

And this is where these hack groups could be screwing us all over. If they keep this up the general public starts to fear for their security on the net. (After all members of the Arizona police are part of the general public.) The mainstream media can spin this as they like. Most likely painting these hack groups as terrorist threats. And boom, they now have a perfect excuse to push their protect IP bullshit. The formula is easy. Create/allow problem that induces fear in then general public - step in to solve problem with previously unpopular agenda. These hack groups just need to stop. They aren't doing any good...

Over Control
Over Control

Over Control !! Yes I am a control Freak - What if one day you will find yourself monitored every single seconds of your life? Maybe that is a time when people will be able to meet St. Peter in Heaven's Gate before even Death .. Like he would say - Johnny this is your report card of your life lol! I think this would be funny - I Don't Care about this fascist people but I dare to control everything I dare you..

RIAA
RIAA

Doesn't have a brain.

Anonymous
Anonymous

They just don't get it. I'm Anonymous. You're Anonymous. We're all Anonymous. This is the people taking a stand when our democracy (if, representative democracy can even be considered democracy) has turned into a plutocracy.Did you get to vote to wage war in Iraq? Did you get to vote to wage war in Afghanistan? Did you get to vote on whether or not ProtectIP is passed? Did you get to vote on whether the homeless could be fed in Orlando parks? Did you get to vote on whether we continue to send BILLIONS of dollars to Israel so they can oppress the people of Palestine? Did you get to vote on Guantanamo? Did you get to vote on whether marijuana should be illegal at the federal level? Did you get to vote on the Patriot Act? Did you get to vote on the bailouts?It is time for direct action.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don't know why people don't get this. Read carefully."Hacking" is NOT illegal. The act of hacking maliciously is illegal, or hacking for the purpose of performing some other crime is illegal. Hacking the security of a bank so it will be intentionally exposed is illegal. Hacking open a padlock protecting somebody elses property is illegal, hacking into the schools computers is illegal.You can setup your own computer and hack into that all you like. You can find a way to hack into your locked home, or modify your car to only start if YOUR cellphone is present. You can freely hack into a computer system if you have been contracted or otherwise authorized by the owner.http://www.hackthissite.org/ is a web site that invites you to try and break into their servers from across the internet and around the world.http://hackaday.com/ is a web site that has nothing but hacks.And my job is to break into agency computer systems to test their security and then report on it. It's my job to hack.Before you claim something is illegal, you need to do some research and study the law. Hacking is not illegal, unlawful hacking is.

Scape-gaot
Scape-gaot

They are using hacker groups as scape-goats....they have to be morons to believe that they will be able to stop hackers and filter each and everybody's data usage.....clearly if a hacker want's to get through security they will

Anonymous
Anonymous

Thanks to LulzSec / #Antisec my friends and I have all reviewed our passwords to ensure they are different for all important sites. Had a positive effect here.Keep spouting your fear tactics.

TerribellTony
TerribellTony

Other than exposing corruption and providing a platform for other humans to communicate safely during government-based Internet blackouts. No, they haven't done anything helpful at all. *rolleyes*

Anonymous
Anonymous

Meant to reply in support of Bonnie below. Apologies.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] for the implementation of draconian cyber security legislation. Government and corporate groups cited LulzSec and Anonymous lawlessness last June to push the so-called Protect IP Act (known as [...]

  2. [...] for the implementation of draconian cyber security legislation. Government and corporate groups cited LulzSec and Anonymous lawlessness last June to push the so-called Protect IP Act (known as [...]



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