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NATO Investigates LulzSec Hack

NATO Investigates LulzSec Hack

Looks into Hacktivist group’s release of 11,619 usernames and passwords of NATO’s online book shop.

LulzSec may have decided to bid “bon voyage” to the anti-security movement, but the fallout from its campaign continues to be felt.

This past Saturday LulzSec said it was sailing off into the susnet because its “planned 50-day cruise has expired.” The hacktivist group, which left behind a string of embarrassing attacks on the CIA, FBI, PBS, Sony, FOX, the Arizona Police dept, and more, made one last data dump that included sensitive information obtained from NATO’s e-Bookshop site.

The data contained the usernames and passwords of 11,619 of the site’s users. No classified material was leaked.

In a statement NATO says it is investigating the matter.

“Police dealing with digital crimes have notified NATO of a probable data breach from a NATO-related website operated by an external company,” it said in a press release. “NATO’s e-Bookshop is a separate service for the public for the release of NATO information and does not contain any classified data. Access to the site has been blocked and subscribers have been notified.”

It added that the news was another reason why the Alliance already agreed to develop and implement and cyber defense action plan to prevent, detect, defend against and recover from cyber-attacks such as these.

NATO apparently took the e-Bookshop offline until it sorts the matter out.

Stay tuned.

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Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
joker
joker

What a lame attempt! Claims were that sensive information were stolen classified restricted documents blah blah blah... "Restricted" is the lowest classification for documents. Publicly releasable information is "restricted". And the fact that it's "Classified" documents means nothing because EVERYTHING is classified. The word "Classified" doesn't mean secret, it means it's been given a status, even if the status is that it's completely non-sensitive and worthless documents. Hell, even the most worthless information is given a classification. Also, this attack on the book shop was a total joke. It's a FREE SERVICE available to EVERYONE and has absolutely no sensitive infomation contained on it's servers... It's also on a completely different network than anything important. Anything "stolen" was already made publicly available. What a waste of time. That's like breaking into the Mozilla servers to "steal" a copy of FireFox when it's freely available on their website.

disinter
disinter

How much shit has been and is being stolen that we will never know about?

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

You know what's epic? The fact that organizations who were hacked never had a clue until data about them was dumped publically. Only then did organizations that were affected begin an investigation. It's like someone breaking in to an office, stealing a huge stack of paper and leaving. After a few weeks, printing off a few million copies and pasting them on every street corner in town. Then, and only then, did the organization notice and start an investigation. How much evidence are they going to find after all this time when they didn't even notice the moment they were affected?



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