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Obama Planning Internet IDs to “Enhance Online Trust and Privacy”

Obama Planning Internet IDs to “Enhance Online Trust and Privacy”

White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt cautions it won’t be a national ID program as critics claim it would be, but rather a necessary system for creating trusted digital identities to enhance the security of online transactions, and also a means for relieving the burden of having to remember dozens of usernames and passwords.

The Obama administration certainly isn’t trying to allay fears of federal intrusion into the everyday lives of US citizens it seems with news that it plans to relieve the burden of having to “remember dozens of user names and passwords” by creating an Internet ID for all Americans.

Speaking at Stanford University, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt spoke about plans for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC)

“We have a major problem in cyberspace, because when we are online we do not really know if people, businesses, and organizations are who they say they are,” said Schmidt. “Moreover, we now have to remember dozens of user names and passwords. This multiplicity is so inconvenient that most people re-use their passwords for different accounts, which gives the criminal who compromises their password the ‘keys to the kingdom.’”

He cautioned that it wasn’t a national ID program as critics claim it would be, but rather a system for creating trusted digital identities to enhance the security of online transactions.

Schmidt continued:

We need a cyber world that enables people to validate their identities securely, but with minimal disclosure of information when they’re doing sensitive transactions (like banking) – and lets them stay anonymous when they’re not (like blogging). We need a vibrant marketplace that provides people with choices among multiple accredited identity providers ” both private and public ” and choices among multiple credentials. For example, imagine that a student could get a digital credential from her cell phone provider and another one from her university and use either of them to log-in to her bank, her e-mail, her social networking site, and so on, all without having to remember dozens of passwords. Such a marketplace will ensure that no single credential or centralized database can emerge. In this world, we can cut losses from fraud and identity theft, as well as cut costs for businesses and government by reducing inefficient identification procedures. We can put in-person services online without security trade-offs, thereby providing greater convenience for everyone.

He calls it the “Identity Ecosystem” and says that nobody will be forced to get a credential if they don’t want to. The govt also has no plans for a central database to store digital identities, and it’s looking to the “leadership of the private sector” to implement the NSTIC.

The proposal sounds rather tame, but the same was likely said of Social Security numbers. The govt insisted they would never be used for identification purposes, but these days it’s used to identify you in everything from your monthly utility bill to your bank account number.

Moreover, once the NSTIC is place it seems likely only a matter of time before it becomes difficult to conduct business or interact with sites unless you have a “Trusted Identity.”

What do you think about the proposal?

Stay tuned.

[email protected]

Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
shitshit
shitshit

fuck this shit, please don't fuck the internet up! wtf!!?

PS
PS

"We have a major problem in cyberspace, because when we are online we do not really know if people, businesses, and organizations are who they say they are"Remind me again why this is a bad thing?

disinter
disinter

Yeah right like obama really gives a shit about palin's email being hacked. Just more "New world order" bullshit. Finally change has come to america!!!!!! Vote Cthulhu in 2012, why choose the lesser evil????

Eloh
Eloh

LOL! You know this law was thought up by old people:"...and also a means for relieving the burden of having to remember dozens of usernames and passwords."If you can't keep track of your fucking passwords, then you don't belong on the net. You don't even have to REMEMBER them! There are password keeping utilities like (someone mentioned above) Keepass or some others... write them down... do SOMETHING to keep track of these.We don't need a potentially privacy-invading, online ID tracking thing. If you get scammed over the internet, it's your own damn fault! Research the seller of the goods/services, make sure they are reputable, and not just some fly-by-night Chinese con-artists.If you're afraid of being cyber-stalked, then don't make a profile on Facebook or Twitter (etc). No one promised you would be safe from online predators/stalkers. Use common fucking sense.But of course everyone here knows what I'm saying, so I guess I'm just wasting my time, unless those clueless politicians stumble onto ZeroPaid somehow.

Paul Hamilton
Paul Hamilton

Mitre Corporation has been working on this for several year>

Arthur Jensen
Arthur Jensen

Maybe it's because Sarah Palin and several prominent fucking idiots/goons had their passwords axxd. Coupled with the whole 'collateral murder' video. They would love this. They cannot have it....

Jordan H
Jordan H

Really seems like identify theft will be much easier with this. Not so sure Congress will support this,

John V. Karavitis
John V. Karavitis

John V. Karavitis Everyone is complaining about privacy. Privacy will still be available. Rather, the issue is preventing crimes from occurring, e.g. identity theft and cyber-stalking. John V. Karavitis, John Karavitis, Karavitis

Arthur Jensen
Arthur Jensen

'For example, imagine that a student could get a digital credential from her cell phone provider and another one from her university and use either of them to log-in to her bank, her e-mail, her social networking site, and so on, all without having to remember dozens of passwords.' She does however, need to remember her authorized and institutionally issued 'credentials'. Where is Jared Loughner when we really need him....Yay, I can outsource my password creation/storing to the government and corporations. So only me, the government and corporations can read it... This is a great idea. Someone think of the children, terrorists, fraud, whatever you need to just go quietly. F%*& the USG, CIA, NSA, RIAA, MPAA, and F&*% ICANN. Obama you dirty prick

Go2
Go2

Fuck Obongo, fucking coon.

Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

Instead of this BS they should lift the 'embargo' they have on open, alternate encryption methods (that they don't have a government key to). Lets see how privacy/security takes off then...

Scary Devil Monastery
Scary Devil Monastery

What "embargo"? AES is still open source and good enough for just about any level of security. The protocols used in transfers is another thing, and the reliance on proprietary systems which may or may not have backdoors yet another.

Gee
Gee

Lets see I have a lot of locks in my life. Car..house...office etc.. and you want me to have one key. Why are politician's so freaking stupid. Not just about the net, they are just dumb ass'sThe web is fine just keep your scummy hand off of it.

10Pound
10Pound

Fuck. That.Has nobody ever heard of Keepass or any other of the litany of password vault programs out there? My passwords never stray from the 10-20 mixed case alphanumeric string variety and each one is unique. I don't have any problems.Oh yeah...and fuck McCain & fuck Palin & fuck Ron Paul & fuck all politicians.

disinter
disinter

Finally "Change has come to america". Change meaning the same old shit except a little worse. Fuck obama.

jack
jack

identity theft easier now? smart...

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

Hmm, this actually sounds an awful lot like Microsoft's .net passport from several years ago. If I remember correctly, it was an abysmal failure because other systems popped up. The system is only effective if it is ubiquitous - which was something .net wasn't.My big concern with an idea like this is that, if it is successful, the government would ave a better fix of all of your online activities. So this raises a fair number of privacy concerns.Lawyer: "So, three days before you were seen on the streets completely drunk, you logged on to a homosexual lifestyle website to proclaim that you were going to, and I quote, 'get completely wasted' according to your digital ID activity log, is that true?" Defendant: "Uh, I'm, uh, not gay for one and-" Lawyer: "Oh, but you log on to at least four of these sites. The digital ID logs also say you have an STD. Is that, or is that not you?" Defendant: "I don't see how this is relevant to the case!" Judge: "Let's stay on track here." Lawyer: "Very well."Newspaper headline next day: "Flaming Homosexual STD Sicko - Court Documents"

Boomer The Dog
Boomer The Dog

Reading it, that sounds like more complexity in the system, like committees off line that oversee things and get bogged down in details, or more and more laws that keep getting created. I don't see why there's a problem now, you just need internet street smarts to survive, the same as it's been for decades on line.On the internet, no one knows you're a Dog. I think that being anonymous is a good thing. I've always had the same name and been direct about who I am, but I know some friends who learned a lot by trying out and using different identities, it gave them the freedom that they needed, like learning what their sexual identity was, big issues like that. Even Facebook tries to take that away.Drew, I never even knew what the Net Passport from Microsoft was about, so I never paid attention to it. I remember when that popped up with a new computer once, and I thought it was one of their trial products.Boomer'more options' not working so: http://boomerthedog.net

Signa
Signa

Well, this wasn't what I thought it was when I first heard about it, but it still sounds like something that will be nothing but headaches. I can imagine phishing sites gathering these online identities with ease, because no one is going to keep such a thing as safely guarded as they would with a SSN.If a site asks me for my SSN, I ask "why"? If a site asks me for my online ID number, I'll say "ok".

Aerikteh
Aerikteh

Ridiculous! Everything can be hacked. Hell I prefer my numerous online id's and passwords as opposed to a single identity. One hack and boom! Access to everything. I want to be in charge of my own security. I don't care about the hundreds of dumbass's out there too inept to handle it.

X
X

How is having only one digital identity that is used for everything any better than using the same password for everything, or is there some iris scan involved or something



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