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BREIN Shutters 384 BitTorrent Sites, World Yawns

BREIN Shutters 384 BitTorrent Sites, World Yawns

Dutch anti-piracy group cleans house in ways that the IFPI, RIAA, and MPAA surely envy, shuttering 422 “illegal websites,” 5 usenet indexers, and an FTP summit site so far this year.

While the world’s attention was focused on the Federal govt’s recent “Operation In Our Sites,” Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN was the one making the biggest dent in online piracy. The Feds managed to seize a measly 9 domain names while BREIN, so far this year, has managed to shutter 422 illegal websites, including 384 BitTorrent tracker sites and 29 Cyberlockers sites where it says some 30,000 “illegal files were removed.”

“We’ve also closed five usenet indexers, 6 streaming sites, and an FTP summit site,” it adds.

What makes the news so odd is that for having successfully managed to close so many sites, the 384 BitTorrent tracker sites in particular, nobody seems to have noticed or even cared. The business of P2P has gone on rather undisturbed it would seem.

So what’s going on? BREIN boss Tim Kuik, wisely not wanting to give targets additional traffic and popularity, is keeping his cards close to his chest. He does, however discuss how the process works.

“The take down most often takes place through the hosting provider,” BREIN boss Tim Kuik told TorrentFreak. “We also obtain identity details from the hosting providers but these sites tend to register under a false name. If the site changes to another hosting provider, we will contact that provider. In case all else fails we will go for blocking of the site by access providers. Currently there is court case pending about that.”

With 422 “illegal sites” down so far this year and plenty of time left on the clock before 2011 arrives, BREIN is managing to do what the US govt, the RIAA, IFPI, and MPAA have so far been unable to – close down more than just a handful of sites per year. The sad thing is that for all of its hard work, as I mentioned before, nobody’s really noticed.

Stay tuned.

[email protected]

[TR via TF]

Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
Jon
Jon

Maybe pirates didn't notice because Netherlands doesn't host that many big torrent sites? On the other hand, I can guarantee every other government and copyright group like RIAA/MPAA etc DID notice, and will be using this as a template going forward. Do you think you will only yawn if America does the same? Britain? Germany? France? Sweden? Why wouldn't they? Precedent is being set. Keep yawning, Jared.

Anon
Anon

Here's an idea: serve every website via I2P also. That would be pretty hard to censor, wouldn't it.

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

ZeroPaid: "BREIN Shutters 384 BitTorrent Sites, World Yawns" Register: "Torrent sites: Here today, gone tomorrow and no one even cares" TF: "what can only be described as a wholesale slaughter of file-sharing" I'm guessing TF was joking. --- I never really noticed a difference in the BitTorrent world myself. The only closures I've seen were of the "don't feel like playing admin anymore" variety. Does anyone even know what sites were shut down? Doesn't sound like anything big was nailed unless it was non-English sites which would be a bit more difficult to track for us [made-up word] uni-linguals [/made-up word].

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

"Do you think you will only yawn if America does the same? Britain? Germany? France? Sweden? Why wouldn’t they? Precedent is being set. Keep yawning, Jared." Uh... for one, there aren't that many people dumb enough to host a BitTorrent site in the US left (and for those that do and get busted, the general response is that they had it coming for a lot of people in the know). For another, precedent doesn't work from one country to another. It's like trying to apply the DMCA in Sweden. That worked really well against ThePirateBay, didn't it? Besides, BitTorrent sites have been taken down for years now. Suprnova was taken down in 2004 to name one example.

Jon
Jon

So if torrent sites are wholly eliminated from American and European hosting, what will be next? ISP's will be required to block torrent sites in countries that do not comply with those laws. In America, the infrastructure is already being set up for doing so in the "Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act of 2010". Australia has its firewall. Others will surely follow. And, yes, precedent does work from country to country. It works by providing a model for other countries to operate from. Now no one can say "it is impossible to keep up with the rate new sites pop up". BREIN has proven it is entirely possible.

Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

If you say so. Personally, I thought the idea of DPI was more threatening than this. There's been tonnes of site shutdowns in the past already in years past, so this is nothing new. I've seen web censorship before and that got people out in the streets (Germany had a few big ones) Attempts to put up censorwalls have been bungled in so many places. Australia has been trying to put up one for a long time now and it's still trying. Guess what? A proxy defeats it. The Chinese have been defeating the great firewall of China for years now and we're talking about a Chinese government trying to censor the internet and failing at it. Additionally, if you want to look at a great example of how precedent works from country to country, try looking at the US trying to make file-sharing illegal in Spain. That battle has been going on at least since 2006: http://www.zeropaid.com/news/7951/spain_legalizes_filesharing_if_not_for_profit/ To this day, that fight is going on and a more recent article shows that little has changed: http://www.zeropaid.com/news/86666/spanish-judge-rules-not-for-profit-p2p-is-legal/ If you want to think precedent spans multiple countries like that, be my guest. I'll be more optimistic and say that some states in Europe still have a sense of sovereignty.



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