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Paramount Exec: Cyberlockers Real Threat, Not P2P

Paramount Exec: Cyberlockers Real Threat, Not P2P

Paramount Pictures COO Frederick Huntsberry says that “cyberlockers now represent the preferred method by which consumers are enjoying pirated content,” and that disconnecting file-sharers vis a vis a “three-strikes” regime won’t be able to identify those that do.

As copyright holders lament that their business models are outdated and wholly unsuited to a digital world, the world of P2P marches onward, developing ever new methods to distribute content in ways that evades their best detection capabilities. Paramount Pictures COO Fredrick Huntsberry seems to have acknowledged this fact recently at the Cinema Expo in Amsterdam this past week, telling an audience that Cyberlockers are the new threat, and that “three-strikes” regimes can’t target those that use them.

“Cyberlockers now represent the preferred method by which consumers are enjoying pirated content,” he said.

P2P has always been a constantly evolving creature with the best and brightest always developing new ways to share content with one another. It’s not so much a fascination with “getting stuff for free,” as copyright holders put it, but rather about making stuff available in places and at times that copyright holders either refuse to or charge prices for that make it virtually inaccessible.

Cyberlockers like MegaUpload and the more popular Rapidshare allow users to host copyrighted material until it’s identified by copyright holders who then ask that the links be removed. It’s a game of cat and mouse with the law so far having been on the side of Cyberlockers.

Why? Because as a German court ruled last month, sites like Rapidshare cannot be held liable for the copyright infringement committed by third parties using the service, and that the site itself doesn’t make copyrighted material “publicly available.”

More recently, a US judge refused to grant an injunction against the site using similar reasoning.

Stay tuned.

[email protected]

[NT via THR]

Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
Drew Wilson
Drew Wilson

Heh. The only thing I see coming out of this is more variations of ThePirateBay case. The only difference is that these are huge businesses in foreign countries. Already, Viacom lost to YouTube and RapidShare operates under a similar principle. It's hypocritical, in a way, that the US lobby wants other countries to operate much more strictly. Besides, as it is, sites like Rapidshare and MegaUpload are a dime a dozen. There are dozens of different sites willing to take their place if the lobbyists manage to change the laws of one country for the sole purpose of knocking one of these sites offline. Another thing to watch for is unintended consequences for cloud computing because laws surrounding lockers could easily intersect with cloud computing because they both operate under the concept of a server holding data for an individual user. In any event, this plan to go after locker sites is dead on arrival. The only thing that'll be different is that this would probably end worse than the attacks on BitTorrent sites because of the business aspect of this (unlike private sites which are donation based sites) - a much more formidable opponent. This could, however, be only the second time that these organizations thought about going after anything less harmless than a high school student living in their dorms.

disinter
disinter

Sometimes I really hate the U.S. judicial system because it encourages corruption for those with the cash to "play the game". A blatant precedent could be set with a case and the **AA's lose. Well they will just repackage the suit and file again with slightly different terms and get another bite of the apple. It's only a matter of time before they win because most people just don't have the funds to stand up to them time after time.

zerozero
zerozero

So banks will be responsible for illegal items in safe deposit boxes?

A person
A person

It won't be long before they destroy privacy entirely in the name of profits.



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