RSS
Add to Chrome
Verizon to Forward Warnings from RIAA, MPAA

Verizon to Forward Warnings from RIAA, MPAA

Second largest phone company in the US agrees to forward notices of copyright infringement on behalf of the entertainment industry, perhaps hinting at a sign of things to come as ISPs slowly enter the world of content distribution.

Perhaps hinting a sign of things to come, Verizon Communications will reportedly begin forwarding notices of copyright infringement to its customers at the behest of both the MPAA and RIAA.

The moves is part of an unspecified “test” that will begin this Thursday, the test probably meaning to determine whether the benefits of helping protect copyrighted – and vis a vis possible future content distribution partnerships – outweigh the costs of angering customers.

“We recognize the importance of copyright and the need to enforce those copyrights,” a Verizon spokesman told CNet. “Without that enforcement, intellectual property won’t be generated at all. At the same time, it’s important for our customers to be assured that they won’t have their privacy rights trampled.”

The letters will be of the standard fare, warning customers they downloaded copyrighted material illegally which they must delete, and to refrain from the practice in the future.

It’s an about face for Verizon who once fought the RIAA all the way to the Supreme Court to protect the privacy and free speech of its customers.

Verizon has apparently decided to keep quiet about its deal with the MPAA, but an NBC Universal rep was more than happy to comment.

“We are happy to be working with the ISP community to raise awareness about inappropriate online activity,” it told CNet. “The notice from NBCU that accompanies the ISP’s letter includes a link through which consumers can learn about legitimate content online, and provides a number to call if consumers feel they have been contacted in error. We note, however, that virtually no users have contested the accuracy of the notices.”

So why the new partnerships?

I believe it’s simply looking to create and protect a new revenue stream as more and more people turn to the Internet for entertainment. The Internet is the future of content distribution and ISPs like Verizon are eager to partner with copyright holder groups like the RIAA and MPAA, who are also eager in kind, to create secure content delivery services they can monetize.

It’s a sure sign of things to come, and is precisely why network neutrality is so important, especially considering the lack of regional competition. As ISPs transition from providing a dumb “series of tubes” to services with competing online interests, there will be a real incentive for it block applications and services in order to protect its economic interests.

Stay tuned.

[email protected]

Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
Z-man
Z-man

I got a couple of letters like this from Verizon over a year ago, something to the effect of "copyrighted content on your computer according to NBC.com or ABC.com" or some such. This isn't a new thing, but it was pretty easily dealt with.

Signa
Signa

I don't know what this article is saying, my friend got several notices, and he's on the same FiOS package I am on. I've never got a notice, so I don't know if it's just a matter of time now that they are declaring their change in privacy policy, or if I'm just that lucky in choosing my sources.

@IceCube85
@IceCube85

I really find this move interesting. Because ACTA has recently made waves thanks to recent leaks which say that the copyright industry wants ISPs to do all their dirty work, bi-passing the DMCA and enforcing a three strikes law in the US, it seems that this is a signal from Verizon that they are willing to screw with their customers, only going at this with a thin wedge approach. They are doing small things like passing off these notices onto customers before they simply comply with an industry prediminantly owned by foreign entitiies (yes, even to the US) I recall there being a similar move in Britain a year ago where they sent some 10,000 notices onto their customers. I really liked that BBC clip of this confused college student who got this note saying that he could be violating copyright laws because his response is, "Uh... I just use e-mail. I don't really know much about P2P to be honest." I suspect something similar could happen in the US. Knowing the copyright industry, they won't exactly learn from their mistakes.

Desh
Desh

Network Neutrality will not protect you from this. Network neutrality is a back door Trojan for the government to really start clamping down on internet regulation. We need more competition, not NN.

Gamer8585
Gamer8585

Seriously Desh, are you brain damaged? That's like saying the government raising a military or having a civil police force is the first part of some grand Machiavellian scheme to create a repressive fascist state. Net Neutrality regulation is meant to preserve the web as a neutral communication platform. Free from functional interference by competing interests. While more competition among ISPs would be best the start up costs are prohibitive, and since any start up would have to compete with businesses of scale they wouldn't have the revenue stream to offer enough value for customers to switch. In addition many smaller ISPs lease the fiber from other large companies so data still may be intercepted and tampered with if those larger ISPs strike a deal with the content industry. Please think through your proposals before replying to anymore news articles in the future.

soulxtc
soulxtc

Are u kidding? It prevents ISPs who are slowly entering the world of content distribution from being able to prevent the use of competing applications and services on their networks. Whats to say that Comcast, for example, decides to create a pay VOD service and then subsequently decides to block Netflix? That govt control argument is utter nonsense. The govt says nothing but that ISPs cant block people from using applications and services of their choosing. Dont want network neutrality? Then first demand real ISP competition.

Mountain_rage
Mountain_rage

No, Net neutrality was a grassroots campaign to get the government to mandate that internet bandwidth can't be managed, that all traffic should be treated neutrally. Its a recent marketing ploy by ISP's that has pushed the idea that Netneutrality is bad, they are the ones that are favoring the idea of free market ideals. Your just a pawn, spreading their message. Explain to me how net neutrality increases government regulation of the internet?

malcolm hume
malcolm hume

Yeah, make them common carriers so you can link to your local pipes and get service from any conpany you want.

D.AN
D.AN

You are obviously oblivious to the principles of network neutrality.



VyprVPN Personal VPN lets you browse securely