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South Korea’s “Three-Strikes” Law Takes Effect

South Korea’s “Three-Strikes” Law Takes Effect

Tough new anti-P2P efforts include six-month suspension of Internet connections for those accused of copyright infringement.

Back in March Korea’s National Assembly’s Committee on Culture, Sports, Tourism, Broadcasting & Communications (CCSTB&C) passed a bill to amend the country’s copyright laws so as to include a so called “three strikes,” or “graduated response,” system for combating illegal file-sharing.

Today those amendments take effect, making South Korea the first country to institute a system that includes terminating the Internet connections of people accused of copyright infringement.

Under the revised law people accused of copyright infringement can have their Internet connections suspended for up to six months. Regulators can also shut down Web sites after a third warning over copyright infringement, regardless of whether or not the copyright holders complained about it.

However, the govt says it’s mainly targeting those engaged in large-scale illegal uploading or distribution of copyrighted material with the intent of making profits.

How long this last remains to be seen. I’m sure copyright holders won’t refrain from targeting noncommercial file-sharers under the new law, especially being that teens charged with illegal file-sharing has skyrocketed from 611 in 2006 to 23,470 last year.

Up until this past February South Korean police actually worked to help young file-sharers avoid hefty settlement fines by recommending summary trials to address charges of copyright infringement. Police wanted to use summary trials because it means fines of less than 200,000 won ($146 USD). They feared kids would grow desperate and resort to theft or other crime to come up with the large amount of settlement money demanded by copyright holders.

Stay tuned.

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Jared Moya
I've been interested in P2P since the early, high-flying days of Napster and KaZaA. I believe that analog copyright laws are ill-suited to the digital age, and that art and culture shouldn't be subject to the whims of international entertainment industry conglomerates. Twitter | Google Plus
manakazero
manakazero

What else would you do in South Korea with insanely fast internet speeds than download illegally?!

bruce
bruce

well this may or may not be enforced... many laws in South Korea (i live there, by the way) are selectively ignored by either the police, the government, the people, or just everyone... prostitution is available everywhere, for example. and whale meat is common. and dog meat is still technically illegal, but common. in fact these things are advertised with big signs!it is widely known that the cops drink on duty, and really have nothing to do anyways..there is no real crime to speak of.and even drunk driving is barely enforced even if they catch you...drugs, on the other hand, or a serious matter, for some reason. this is true all around the world, and i will never understand it....with alcohol legal and many prescription drugs available easily anyways, and also tons of herbs that can be quite strong...i doubt this law will be enforced much.if it is, however, there are PC-Bangs (bang means room) where you can rent computers with no ID for about 50c and hour and you can connect USB devices to them, and run whatever software you want on insanely high speed connections (like you might get a full movie in 10 minutes or a music album in 1-2 minutes...)or there are cafes with Wifi and free internet access..and libraries, etc.filesharing will never go away.besides all that, there are so many "rapid share" type of services for a few dollars a month, and so forth.honestly, i think laws like these are more like the government trying to look good on to the world, more than anything.like when they outlawed dog meat for the Seoul Olympics, and China did the same kind of thing for Beijing.yet further, the record companies are all on the rocks now, and i expect the RIAA the kind of fade away with them soon enough.if only they realized that P2P is free advertising for them and actually has INCREASED their business.if they were at all smart they would allow it and then focus on selling concert tickets and paraphenalia like T-Shirts....the number of new fans for many bands is increasing exponentially worldwide because of sharing...are they stupid enough not to make money off it somehow, instead of alienating all their fans and the artists (particularly up and coming ones)?? apparently they are that stupid.the Radioheads and Trent Reznors of the world will now take over the business and ART can finally get closer to its true goal of entertaining and enlightening more people.and its about f'in' time. :-D

jspaces
jspaces

I thought only the north Korea was repressed. Sure lets make all south Korea young people criminals. What are they thinking?

mountain_rage
mountain_rage

Wait, so which Korea is run by a dictatorship again?



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